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Posts Tagged ‘Talent Development’


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This post was written by Susan Fry, Vice President, Creative Strategy, KnowledgeStar.

A recent experience proved how dangerous adhering to the old “push” model can be. In consulting with one of the world’s best-known NGOs, I conducted an exhaustive series of interviews with Managers and Directors at different levels, located in countries around the globe.

This NGO is funded to do work throughout the world improving health — which also means working to eradicate deadly diseases or control outbreaks. The interviews quickly revealed that members of the NGO in one country were not sharing information that could be extremely beneficial to coworkers in other countries, even though doing so surely could have eliminated suffering and saved lives.

Deeper investigation revealed that the NGO had a long-established culture of “hoarding” learning and training and doling it out to those that the top management had decided they wanted to bring into “the fold.” When a favored few rose to the top in their own country, they were invited to the world headquarters located in a vibrant, wealthy city, where they were wined, dined and welcomed into the elite “inner circle.”

They then moved to the headquarters city to take their new positions, where they communicated information to the other “elites,” occasionally returning to their home countries. The pattern had been in place for years and there was little desire to change it — even though changing to a learning culture could clearly make them much more agile, effective and successful in meeting the stated goals of their organization.

This exposes one of the dangers of a “pull” learning culture as well, where inputting knowledge is power. If I go to my PC, it is KIKO (Knowledge In, Knowledge Out). The technology systems that enable the learners are only as good as the information they contain. If the underlying culture is still embedded in the old command-and-control hierarchy in which knowledge is power, then selectively sharing knowledge will become power.

The culture is the bedrock upon which leaders, learners and the enabling technology is built. In a true learning culture people instinctively believe that sharing knowledge is empowering and automatically act on that belief.

This is yet one more reason to build a real learning culture and not just erect a facade that might be able to pass for one.

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Here’s the press release from Cisco and a video of Jeanne Beliveau-Dunn explaining the importance of the new certification:

Cisco Introduces The New Virtual Classroom Instruction Specialist Certification

Vendor-Neutral Training and Certification Helps Instructors Make

The New Virtual Classrooms Engaging and Improves Student Outcomes

SAN DIEGO, CA and SAN JOSE, CA — (MARKET WIRE) — 02/07/11 — Training 2011, Booth 416 — With more educators using technology to advance the classroom experience, Cisco (NASDAQ: CSCO) today announced the Cisco® Leading Virtual Classroom Instruction certification, developed to build and validate the skills that educators and instructors need to effectively teach in virtual classroom environments.

Key Facts

  • According to the American Society for Training & Development, 37 percent of training in 2009 involved electronic technology, up from 15 percent in 2002, while face-to-face instruction fell to 59 percent.
  • The Cisco Leading Virtual Classroom Instruction (LVCI) course teaches participants how to prepare and manage a virtual classroom, effectively deliver material online, and use collaboration tools to maximize student participation and comprehension.
  • LVCI goes beyond tool usage and teaches instructors how to improve learner outcomes through more effective classroom collaboration. They learn how to become Facilitators and work collaboratively with their learners
  • LVCI is delivered virtually using Cisco WebEx™; however, the skills are readily transferable to other conferencing and collaboration tools.
  • LVCI consists of 17.5 hours of live virtual instruction and six hours of participant presentations, delivered over five consecutive days.
  • LVCI is designed and led by experienced WebEx University instructors, who have delivered more than 40,000 hours of virtual training sessions.
  • Certification will be based on a proctored multiple-choice exam (642-132 LVCI) and a practical demonstration (642-133 LVCIP), in which the candidate uses the best practices of virtual classroom delivery.

Supporting Quotes:

  • Jeanne Beliveau-Dunn, vice president and general manager, Learning@Cisco, said: “As the paradigm of education continues to evolve to meet new institutional and business requirements, developing instructional strategies for new virtual education environments is becoming key to improving student results. The Virtual Classroom Instruction Specialist training and certification help ensure that instructors have the most comprehensive understanding of the latest technologies and effective classroom collaboration strategies. Cisco’seducational offerings provide the skills and depth of knowledge required for educators to differentiate themselves in today’s job market and enable a competitive advantage for their employers.”
  • Kathy Cooper, senior product trainer, WebEx University, said: “Cisco Virtual Classroom Instruction Specialist certification not only covers the skills and techniques instructors need to prepare and manage a virtual classroom, but also shows how instructors can engage learners in the educational process and increase their participation and comprehension.”
  • David Mallon, principal analyst, Bersin & Associates, said: “Our Virtual Classroom research shows that learning in an online environment is both less expensive and can be more instructionally rich than physical in-class experiences. Our research also demonstrates that what makes a great instructor effective online is the skillful use of collaboration tools. As job training and education continue to move online, this type of certification is an important offering.”
  • David Grebow, Instructional Designer, KnowledgeStar said: “This course is a game changer and will make the virtual classrooms the choice for learning in the 21st century. I had the privilege of working with some of the most forward-thinking and smart people at Cisco and WebEx, and we produced a certification program that will turn instructors into facilitators and students into adult learners collaborating with each other and taking the learning beyond the virtual classroom. It’s a new model for making online education really work.”

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